GuFf

because gluten-free food doesn't have to be rubbish

36 Hours

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It’s like 157 hours, only with less gore. Aged chocolate chip cookies. This is a very strange concept to me, and yet it’s been ambling round the food circuit/blogosphere for a few years now: aged cookie dough makes for much better cookies. The science behind this is, well, erm I’m not entirely sure. Perhaps that the vanilla extract has time to really infuse the dough. Or that the liquids have long enough to form real cohesive bonds with the gluten, or gluten substitute, making for a better texture. Or something else. I’m not really sure. What I do know is patience is a virtue. This is always true in baking – opening the oven door to check if your cake is done even when you know it isn’t is always going to be a bad idea. But here, the patience required is almost superhuman. Make chocolate chip cookie dough, littered with huge chunks of dark chocolate, and tiny crystals of sugar and salt and leave to sit in the fridge for 36 hours before baking. In that time, resist the urge to eat said cookie dough, which is one of a few items that tastes almost better in its raw form, wrong though you know it is.

If you do manage to successfully do this though you’ll be rewarded with fat, hefty cookies that are slightly crunchy on the outside from the sugar (sugar alert, I didn’t really cut back in this recipe as it would affect the texture too much, so they’re pretty sugar heavy) to a soft, chewy interior that in the very centre gives way to an almost cakelike crumb. These will lift you from the deepest of mid-afternoon slumps.

36-hour chocolate chip cookies
From New York Times

The chocolate in these cookies is key. I used three types of chocolate, maybe in part because I had underestimated how many chocolate chips I had and thus had to improvise slightly. I used 100g milk chocolate chips, 200g dark chocolate chips, and a 200g block of cooking chocolate, which I chopped into small chunks. The benefit of doing this is you end up with lots of little flakes of chocolate too, which melt in the batter and provide little flecks of chocolate, along with the big hearty solid chunks.

Ingredients
280g butter
275g light brown sugar
220g white sugar
3 eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
575g gluten-free flour blend
2 teaspoons xanthan gum
 1 1/4 teaspoons baking powder
1 1/2 teaspoons bicarbonate of soda
1 teaspoon fine salt
500g chocolate chips or chocolate chunks

Method
1. In a large bowl cream the butter and the brown and white sugars together for a few minutes until light and pale. One at a time beat in the eggs, then stir in the vanilla.

2. In a medium bowl stir the gluten-free flour, xanthan gum, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and salt together. Slowly stir these into the butter and sugar mixture until just combined. Add the chocolate chunks, stir for 30 seconds or until these are fairly evenly distributed throughout the mixture, then take the huge ball of dough, wrap it in clingfilm and transfer to the fridge to age for 24-36 hours. Try not to eat it in this time.

3. Up top 36 hours later (or even longer, though I think much more scientific tests than mine showed no discernible improvement in taste and texture after 36 hours), preheat the oven to 180 C. Line a couple of baking sheets with parchment paper and scoop balls of the dough onto the baking sheets. The dough balls should be roughly the size of squash balls, and they should be flattened slightly before laying out an inch apart on the baking sheets. Bake in the oven for 15-18 minutes, or until lightly golden, and leave to cool on the sheet for 5 minutes, before transferring to cooling racks.

Makes 36 medium-large cookies (2-3-inches wide) that last well in an airtight container at room temperature, for about a week.

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Written by guffblog

1st August 2011 at 13:46

Posted in Biscuits

Tagged with , , ,

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